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If your family has a history of breast or ovarian cancer Learn about your risk for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and how you can reduce it Do you have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer? Ask yourself the question. The answer could help you be ready against hereditary cancer.
WHAT IS A FAMILY HISTORY OF BREAST OR OVARIAN CANCER?To understand if breast or ovarian cancer runs in your family, look at your whole family history, including your father's side. Breast or ovarian cancer risk isn't just passed from mother to daughter or son. A father can also pass it on to his daughter or son.
YOU COULD HAVE AN INHERITED RISK IF*:• You or a family member (mother's or father's side) were diagnosed with breast cancer at age 50 or youger• You or a family member were diagnosed with ovarian cancer at any age• You have a male family member with breast cancer at any age• You have Ashkenazi Jewish ancestry, and a personal or family history of an HBOC-associated1 cancer at any age• There are two breast cancers in the same person or on the same side of the family• You or a family member were diagnosed with triple negative breast cancer at any age• There is pancreatic cancer and an HBOC-associated1 cancer on the same side of the family• You have a previously identified BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation in your family Most hereditary breast and ovarian cancer occurs because of a mutation in either the BRCA1 or BRCA2 genes.
If you have a BRCA gene mutation, you could have up to an 87% risk of breast cancer and up to a 44% risk of ovarian cancer by age 70.
Understanding if breast or ovarian cancer runs in your family is important. Research shows that early detection – along with taking certain steps–can reduce your risk of developing hereditary cancer.
* Assessment criteria based on medical society guidelines. For these individual medical society guidelines go to www.myriadtests.com/patient_guidelines.
1 HBOC-associated cancers include breast, ovarian, and pancreatic cancer.
What does it mean to have a family history of breast or ovarian cancer? Hereditary breast and ovarian cancer syndrome is an inherited condition that causes an increased risk for breast and ovarian cancer.
Mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes account for the vast majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Knowing if you have a BRCA gene mutation can help you to know your risk of hereditary cancer and inform your family of their potential risk of hereditary cancer.
IMPORTANT FACTS AND FIGURES ABOUT BRCA MUTATIONS.
• Women with a BRCA mutation have: - Up to a 50% risk of developing breast cancer by age 50 - Up to an 87% risk of developing breast cancer by age 70 - Up to a 64% risk of developing a second breast cancer by age 70 - Up to a 44% chance of developing ovarian cancer by age 70• Certain BRCA mutations are more common among people of Ashkenazi Jewish descent• BRCA mutations also increase the risk for other cancers in both men and women, including up to an 8% risk for male breast cancer and up to a 7% risk for pancreatic cancer in men and women. The first step to knowing your risk is understanding your family history.
Complete as much of the chart below as possible. Your answers can help determine if hereditary breast and ovarian cancer runs in your family. Then discuss it with your doctor or another healthcare provider, and alert him or her if you have marked one or more of the boxes below.
Breast cancer at age 50 or younger Two primary breast cancers(in the same person or on the same side of the family) Are you of Ashkenazi Jewish descent? A previously identified BRCA mutation in the family BRACAnalysis® testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer.
BRACAnalysis® is for individuals at risk for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer. It is not like a mammogram or other screening tests that are recommended for every woman. If you and your healthcare professional determine that you may be at risk for hereditary breast or ovarian cancer, BRACAnalysis® is right for you.
BRACAnalysis® does not tell you whether you have cancer, but detects mutations in the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. These are the gene mutations that are responsible for the vast majority of hereditary breast and ovarian cancer. Only a small blood sample is taken for analysis.
HOW YOU CAN USE BRACAnalysis® TEST RESULTS.
The BRACAnalysis® test results may enable you and your family to make more informed choices and help you to be ready against hereditary cancer. For example: • A woman who discovers she has a BRCA mutation can start screening for breast or ovarian cancer when she is younger or choose to reduce her risk of cancer through medication or surgery• A woman already diagnosed wih breast or ovarian cancer can take certain steps to help prevent a second cancer• Individuals with a family history of breast or ovarian cancer may want to know whether they carry a mutation that could be passed down to their children Knowing your test results can also help your doctor or other providers manage your healthcare needs more effectively.
Talk with your healthcare provider about hereditary cancer risk assessment and testing. Knowing your risk empowers you to lower it.
BRACAnalysis® testing can help you find your hereditary breast and ovarian cancer risk, so you can manage it before cancer develops. Professional medical organizations recommend the following options:* • Breast self-exam training and education starting at age 18• Clinical breast exams two times a year starting at age 25• Yearly screening with mammograms and MRI (magnetic resonance imaging) starting at age 25 or individualized based on earliest age of onset in family • Transvaginal ultrasound and testing for CA-125 levels in the blood every 6 months starting at age 30 or 5-10 years earlier than the earliest age of first diagnosis of ovarian cancer in the family • Drug such as tamoxifen or raloxifene have been shown to reduce the risk of both breast and ovarian cancer in high-risk women• Oral contraceptives can significantly reduce the risk of ovarian cancer • Preventive removal of the breasts (mastectomy) significantly reduces the risk of breast cancer• Preventive removal of the ovaries and fallopian tubes (salpingo oopho- rectomy) significantly reduces the risk of ovarian cancer and may also reduce the risk of breast cancer * For reference and supporting data on risk factors and medical management visit www.myriadtests.com/references Myriad Genetics GmbHLeutschenbachstrasse 95 Myriad, the Myriad logo, BRACAnalysis and the BRACAnalysis logo are either trademarks or registered trademarks of Myriad Genetics, Inc., in the United States and other jurisdictions.
2012, Myriad Genetic Laboratories, Inc.

Source: http://www.myriad-genetics.de/admin/kcfinder/upload/files/Myriad_BRAC-PTBRO-09-12ENV1_finalDRAFT.pdf

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Program Annual PhD Meeting – Thursday, 22 November 2012 Parallel sessions information (2 locations) Parallel sessions A: Big lecture hall (Room 30, Day chair: Laura Koenders) Parallel sessions B: Kapelzaal (Room 16, Day chair: Bernard Bloem) Program 09:00 – 09:45 Registration/ Coffee & Tea 09:45 – 09:55 Welcome by day chair (big lecture hall) 10:00 – 11-30

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